02 July, 2016

BCI has decided to pay Rs. 5000/- Stipend to New Advocates



Yes, BCI has decided to pay Rs. 5000/- Stipend to New Advocates.

In order to provide relief to the new advocates who struggle at their initial stage, the Bar Council of India decided to pay Rs. 5000/.- stipend per month for a period of 5 years.

The resolution was passed by the Bar Council of India (BCI) at a joint meeting with the representatives of the State Bar Councils and State Bar Associations at Delhi.




The meeting was held to discuss and formulate schemes and proposals for lawyers.

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02 July, 2016 by Puneet Batish Advocate · 0

27 June, 2016

CrPC Section 164 - Evidentiary value of statement recorded under Section 164 Cr.P.C. - The statement cannot be treated as substantive evidence when the maker does not depose of such facts on oath during trial

CALCUTTA HIGH COURT

Before :- Joymalya Bagchi, J.
C.R.A. 418 of 2012. D/d. 18.9.2014.

Dr. Pankaj Biswas @ Dr. Pankaj Kr. Biswas - Appellant
Versus
State of West Bengal - Respondent

For the Appellants :- Rajdeep Majumder and Bandibrata Dutta, Advocates.
For the State :- Rituparna Dey (Ghosh), Advocate.

Calcutta High Court, West Bengal Judgments

JUDGMENT
Joymalya Bagchi, J. - The appeal is directed against judgment and order dated 14.06.2012 passed by the learned Additional Sessions Judge,

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27 June, 2016 by Puneet Batish Advocate · 0

25 June, 2016

Witness never gave any statement to the Police and his statement was made the part of record of investigation - Police Officer, thus, manipulated a false record of investigation to save somebody from being furnished

BOMBAY HIGH COURT

(Nagpur Bench) 
Before :- C. L. Pangarkar, J. 
Criminal Revision No. 86 of 2007. D/d. 26.7.2007.

Nandkumar S. Kale
Versus
Bhaurao Chandra-bhanji Tidke and Anr.

For the Petitioner :- S. V. Sirpurkar, Counsel.
For the Respondent No. 1 :- V. G. Bhambur-kar, Counsel.
For the Respondent No. 2 :- Y. B. Mandpe, A. P. P.

Cases referred :
Rakesh Kumar Mishra v. State of Bihar, (2006) 1 Supreme Court Cases 557.
Shambhoo Nath Misra v. State of U. P., AIR 1997 Supreme Court 2102,
Sankaran Motira v. Sadhna Das, (2006) 4 Supreme Court Case 584.

For more detail about this judgment,
please contact our helpline number : 094177-67177
or visit our contact us page.

Bombay High Court Judgments

JUDGMENT

C.L. Pangarkar, J. - Rule. Returnable forthwith. Heard finally with consent of parties.
2. This is a revision by an accused. A few facts may be stated thus:
The applicant is a police officer. At the relevant time he was working as in- charge of the Police Station Civil Lines, Akola.

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25 June, 2016 by Puneet Batish Advocate · 0

24 June, 2016

The victim had no control over the investigating agency and the negligence, if any, of the investigating officer could not affect the credibility of the statement of PW - On the basis of the evidence on record, the conviction of the appellant can be sustained

SUPREME COURT OF INDIA

Before :- Mr. P. Sathasivam and Mr. H.L. Dattu, JJ.
Criminal Appeal No(s). 1248 of 2008. D/d. 28.1.2010.

Ram Singh @ Chhaju - Appellant
Versus
State of Himachal Pradesh - Respondent

For the Appellants :- S.N. Bhardwaj, Ms. S. Ramamani, Advocates.
For the Respondent :- Naresh K. Sharma, Advocates.

For more detail about this judgment,
please contact our helpline number : 094177-67177
or visit our contact us page.

Supreme Court of India Judgments

JUDGMENT

H.L. Dattu, J. - This appeal, by the accused, arises out of the judgment of High Court of Himachal Pradesh

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24 June, 2016 by Puneet Batish Advocate · 0

Inefficiency of the Investigating Agency should be no ground to Acquit an Accused

SUPREME COURT OF INDIA

Before :- Surinder Singh Nijjar and Ranjana Prakash Desai, JJ.
Criminal Appeal Nos. 1591 of 2007. D/d. 31.7.2012.

Kashinath Mondal - Appellants
Versus
State of West Bengal - Respondents

For the Appellants :- Mr. Ansar Ahmad Chaudhary, Advocate.
For the Respondents :- Mr. Raja Chatterjee, Mr. Abhijit Sen Gupta, B.P. Yadav and Mrs. Sampa Sengupta, Advocates.

For more detail about this judgment,
please contact our helpline number : 094177-67177
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Supreme Court of India Judgments

JUDGMENT
(Smt.) Ranjana Prakash Desai, J. - The appellant " Kashinath Mondal was tried by the Additional Sessions Judge, Arambagh, Hooghly in S.T. Case No.66 of 2000 for offences punishable under Sections 376 and 302

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by Puneet Batish Advocate · 0

23 June, 2016

Right to Pension cannot be taken away when proceedings pending

SUPREME COURT OF INDIA

Before :- K.S. Radhakrishnan and A.K. Sikri, JJ.
Civil Appeal No. 6770 of 2013 (Arising out of Special Leave Petition (Civil) No. 1427 of 2009) with C.A. No. 6771 of 2013 [Arising out of SLP (C) No. 1428 of 2009]. D/d. 14.8.2013.

State of Jharkhand & Ors. - Appellants
Versus
Jitendra Kumar Srivastava & Anr. - Respondents

Important

Pension or Gratuity and even Leave Encashment cannot be taken away when proceedings pending

For the Appellants :- Mr. Amarendra Sharan, Senior Advocate, Mr. Anil K. Jha and Ms. Priyanka Tyagi, Advocates.
For the Respondents :- Mr. J.S. Attri, Senior Advocate, Mr. Gaurav Sharma, Mr. B.K. Sharma, Ms. Priyanka Bharihoke, Ms. Sushma Suri and Mr. Rajiv Shankar Dvivedi, Advocates.

Supreme Court of India Judgments

JUDGMENT
A.K. Sikri, J. - Leave granted.
2. Crisp and short question which arises for consideration in these cases is as to whether, in the absence of any provision in the Pension Rules, the State Government can withhold a part of pension and/or gratuity during the pendency of departmental/criminal proceedings?

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23 June, 2016 by Puneet Batish Advocate · 0

22 June, 2016

No automatic arrest in 498a, says Supreme Court - Arnesh Kumar Versus State of Bihar & Anr - 2 July, 2014

SUPREME COURT OF INDIA

CRIMINAL APPELLATE JURISDICTION
CRIMINAL APPEAL NO. 1277 OF 2014
(@SPECIAL LEAVE PETITION (CRL.) No.9127 of 2013)

ARNESH KUMAR ..... APPELLANT
VERSUS
STATE OF BIHAR & ANR. .... RESPONDENTS


Supreme Court of India

J U D G M E N T

Chandramauli Kr. Prasad

The petitioner apprehends his arrest in a case
under Section 498-A of the Indian Penal Code, 1860
(hereinafter called as IPC) and Section 4 of the
Dowry Prohibition Act, 1961. The maximum sentence
provided under Section 498-A IPC is imprisonment
for a term which may extend to three years and
fine whereas the maximum sentence provided under
Section 4 of the Dowry Prohibition Act is two
years and with fine.

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22 June, 2016 by Puneet Batish Advocate · 0

20 June, 2016

The presence of investigating officer as witness during trial is must - Departmental proceeding to be initiated against the defaulting IO

JHARKHAND HIGH COURT (D.B.)

Before :- D.N. Patel and P.P. Bhatt, JJ.
Cr. Appeal (D.B.) No. 465 of 2013. D/d. 10.2.2014.

Belal @ Billo @ Md. Belal - Appellant
Versus
State of Jharkhand - Respondent

For the Appellant :- Ashim Kr. Sahani, Advocate.
For the Respondent :- Hemant Kr. Shikarwar, Advocate.

For more detail about this judgment,
please contact our helpline number : 094177-67177
or visit our contact us page.

Jharkhand High Court, Ranchi Judgments

ORDER
This appeal has been admitted vide order dated 5th December, 2013 and record and proceedings of Sessions Trial No.

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20 June, 2016 by Puneet Batish Advocate · 0

Statement of Prosecutrix inspired confidence - Accused convicted even though Prosecutrix forgot to state few facts in FIR and made Improvements in her statement before trial court - Statement did not require corroboration to Convict the Accused

PUNJAB AND HARYANA HIGH COURT (DB)

Before :- R.L. Anand and Virender Singh, JJ.
Criminal Appeal No. 583-DB of 2001. D/d. 6.2.2003

Vikram Singh - Appellant
Versus
State of Haryana - Respondent

For the Appellant :- Mr. Gorakh Nath, Advocate.
For the Respondent :- Mr. Sanjay Vashist, DAG, Haryana

For more detail about this judgment,
please contact our helpline number : 094177-67177
or visit our contact us page.

Cases referred :
State of Punjab v. Gurmit Singh and others, 1996(1) RCR (Cri.) 533 (SC) : AIR 1996 SC 1393.
Prem alias Ballu v. State of Haryana, 2003(1) RCR (Criminal) 237 (SC).
State of Karnataka v. Krishnappa, 2000(2) RCR (Criminal) 459.
State of Rajasthan v. N.K. accused, 2000(2) RCR (Criminal) 471.
Sat Pal v. State of Punjab, 1997(1) Recent CR 93.

Punjab and Haryana High Court, Chandigarh Judgments

JUDGMENT

R.L. Anand, J. - By this judgment we dispose of four criminal appeals - No. 583-DB-2001 titled Vikram Singh v. State of Haryana, No. 373-SB-2001 titled Bhagmal & others v. State of Haryana,

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by Puneet Batish Advocate · 0

19 June, 2016

How To Write a RTI Application - Important Guidelines

Right to InformationEnlargeRight To Information Law passed by Government of India

Pre-Requisites

1. Name, Address, Contact Telephone number, and Email id (if possible).
2. Information about Public Information officer, name, address e.t.c.
3. Locate central Government PIO's here external link
4. And in case you have any problem in locating your PIO/APIO, you can send your RTI application to the PIO C/o Head of Department with the requisite application fee. The Head of Department will have to forward your application to the concerned PIO.
Do not adress your RTI application to the PIO by his name, just in case he gets transferred or a new PIO is designated in his place. Public Authorities under the centre, states, legislatures and Supreme/High courts have framed separate rules for RTI. The amount of fees and the mode of payment varies and you should check the correct rules as applicable in your case.

Methods for depositing fees

1. In person by paying cash [Do take your receipt]
2. By Post through:
(a).Demand Draft/Bankers Cheque
(b).Indian Postal Order
(c).Money orders (only in some states)
(d).Affixing Court fee Stamp (only in some states)
3. For Public Authorities under Central RTI rules, DoPT has recently clarified that BC/DD/IPO can be in favour of "Accounts Officer". If the department or administrative unit does not have a Accounts Officer, they are supposed to designate someone.

Writing Tips

While writing a RTI application, the framing of the questions is of utmost importance. A slight vague questions gives the PIO a chance to reject your application.
Follow these guidelines:
1. Use a white sheet of paper to write an application. There is no need of using Court stamp paper. You can use your letter pad for asking for information.
2. The matter can be hand written, or typed. There is no compulsion of typing the content.
3. Make sure the application is legible and easy to read.
4. There is no restriction on number of pages for asking information.
5. There are also no restriction on number of questions that can be asked in one application. However, it is generally advisable to ask restrict one application with limited set of questions and generally related ones.
NOTE: The state of Karnataka has recently passed a amendment to its RTI rules restricting the RTI application to one subject matter and to 150 words.
6. You need to be specific while asking question
7. Ask as many short questions as you like, but dont go for a lengthy one.
8. Even if you are on some designation, there is no need to mention that, cause law provides the right to ask a question only to a citizen and not to officer post.
9. If the information sought is voluminous, it is better to ask it in the form of CD to save on cost.
10. It is advised not to ask a question with WHY, For example: Why politicians are corrupt or Why parliament didn't passed this bill? Such questions are liable to be rejected being not covered under RTI.
11. Mention the payment details like BC/DD/IPO number, issuing bank/post office, date, cash receipt details , etc., towards the end of your application.

Puneet Batish - Founder & AuthorWritten by: Puneet Batish - ♂ Founder & Author                  GeekUpd8  Find Geek Upd8 on Facebook  Follow Geek Upd8 on Twitter  Add Geek Upd8 on Google+ Circle  Subscribe
An Advocate at District & Session Court and Punjab & Haryana High Court, Chandigarh. He is the founder & author of GeekUpd8 and a Contributor at wikipedia.org, the online encyclopedia.

19 June, 2016 by Puneet Batish Advocate · 2

16 June, 2016

Right of Women to Medically Terminate Pregnancy, Consent of Husband is NOT Required

Right of Women to Medically Terminate Pregnancy, Consent of Husband is NOT Required - Punjab & Haryana High Court

PUNJAB AND HARYANA HIGH COURT
Before :- Jitendra Chauhan, J.
Civil Revision No. 6337 and 6017 of 2011
D/d. 29.11.2011

Dr. Mangla Dogra and others - Petitioners
Versus
Anil Kumar Malhotra and others - Respondents
With
Ajay Kumar Pasricha and others - Petitioners
Versus
Anil Kumar Malhotra and others - Respondents

For the Petitioners (for respondent Nos. 3 and 4 in C.R. No. 6017 of 2011) :- Ms. Alka Sarin, Advocate.
For the Petitioners in C.R. No. 6017 of 2011 and (for respondents No. 3 to 5 in C.R. No. 6337 of 2011) :- Mr. Sandeep Chabbra, Advocate.
For the Respondent No. 1 :- Mr. Ashwani Talwar, Advocate.
For the Respondent No. 2 :- Ms. Seema Pasricha, Advocate.

IMPORTANT
Wife getting the pregnancy terminated - Consent of husband is not required - It is a personal right of a woman to give birth to a child, but it is not the right of a husband to compel her wife to give birth to a child for the husband.

A. Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act, 1971, Sections 3 and 8 - Medical Termination of Pregnancy Rules, 2003, Rules 5 and 8 - Husband and wife having strained relations - Wife getting the pregnancy terminated - Consent of husband express or implied is not required - It is a personal right of a woman to give birth to a child, but it is not the right of a husband to compel her wife to give birth to a child for the husband - The wife is best Judge whether she wants to continue pregnancy or get it aborted - Further held :-

    (i) Husband cannot claim damages from Medical practitioners who were duly qualified to terminate the pregnancy and an authorized hospital to have the pregnancy terminated - No offence or tortuous act was committed by the medical practitioners - Act of Medical practitioners was legal and justified.
[Paras 17, 19, 20, 22 and 27]


Cases Referred :
1. T. Arivandandam v. Staypal, AIR 1977 SC 2421.
2. London S.P. & I Association Ltd. v. M.V. Sea, (2004)9 Supreme Court Cases 512.
3. Anil Kumar Malhotra v. Smt. Seema Malhotra, Civil Revisions No. 6337 of 2011 and No. 6017 of 2011, D/d. 20.8.2011.

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16 June, 2016 by Puneet Batish Advocate · 1

12 June, 2016

Whether a Unsound Mind (Lunatic) person is Competent to Execute a Sale Deed ?

Whether a Unsound Mind (Lunatic) person is Competent to Execute a Sale Deed ?

Jodh Singh v. Registrar (Deputy Commissioner), Distt. Ambala, (P&H)


PUNJAB AND HARYANA HIGH COURT

Before :- V.K. Jhanji, J.

C.W.P. No. 6657 of 1991. D/d. 27.10.1998.

Jodh Singh - Petitioners

Versus

Registrar (Deputy Commissioner), Ambala - Respondents

For the Petitioners :- Mr. Viney Mittal, Sr. Advocate with Mr Arvind Bansal, Advocate.

For the Respondents : - Mr. Harbhagwan Singh, Sr. Advocate with Mr. Arun Nehra, Mr. Ravindra Khandelwal, Mr. L.M. Gulati and Mr. Hittan Nehra, Advocates, and Mr. N.S. Bhinder, DA, Haryana.

A. Contract Act, 1872, Section   11  - Transfer of Property, Act, Section 7 Indian Registration Act, Sections 34, 35, 68      - Sale deed  - Cancellation of  - Question whether a lunatic is competent to sell land vide registered sale deed in favour of the petitioners  - Settled once a person is disqualified from contracting being of unsound mind, a contract by him is void           - A   lunatic by inquisition was not competent to sell the land in favour of petitioners.   [Para 11]

B. Constitution of India, Article  226  - Certiorari  - Indian Registration Act, Sections 34 and 35  - Whether Registrar had any  power under Indian Registration Act to cancel the sale deed registered by the Sub-Registrar  - Order of Registrar cannot be sustained in light of judgments referred      - But writ of Certiorari cannot be issued because nothing has been done by Registrar which could be said to have caused any injustice to the petitioners     - Challenge to order of Registrar fails  - It is not every error of law that would induce this court to exercise extraordinary jurisdiction under Article 226 of the Constitution of India. [Paras 12 and 14]


JUDGMENT

1. In this petition, challenge is to order dated 20.3.1991 passed by the Registrar (Deputy Commissioner), Ambala where by the Registrar in exercise of his powers under Section 68 of the Indian Registration Act has ordered cancellation of sale-deed dated" 15.2.1991 alleged to have been executed by Swaran Singh in favour of petitioners.

2. It is the case of the petitioners that Swaran Singh was owner of land measuring 234 Kanals 10 marlas situated in village Nauhni, Tehsil and District Ambala, vide registered sale-deed dated 15.2.1991, Swaran Singh sold his entire land for a consideration of Rs. 14,16,000/-. On 28.2.1991, Puran Singh (respondent No. 3) on his behalf and on behalf of Swaran Singh filed an application before the Registrar under Section 68 of the Indian Registration Act alleging therein that sale-deed executed by Swaran Singh is a void document because Swaran Singh was not competent to execute the same or sell his property being a person of unsound mind and an idiot from his very childhood. Upon notice of the application, petitioners by filing reply, denied the allegations. Petitioners contended that Swaran Singh was fully competent to execute the sale-deed and they are bonafide purchasers for consideration. Petitioners further contended that they had purchased the property after making necessary enquiry with regard to title of the vendor. Registrar vide order dated 203.1991 recorded a finding that Swaran Singh was of unsound mind and the sale-deed allegedly executed by him in favour of petitioners is simply a concoction. Registrar held that the Sub Registrar had no power to register a document purported to have been presented by a person of unsound mind. The sale-deed was thus, ordered to be cancelled. Hence, the present writ petition challenging the order of the Registrar on the ground that Registrar had no power under Section 68 of the Act to cancel the sale-deed registered by the Sub Registrar.

3. Learned counsel appearing on behalf of petitioners has contended that the powers of the Sub Registrar in registering a document presented to him for registration are absolute. It is contended that the Statute does not give any power to the Registrar to cancel registration of a document registered by the Sub Registrar. Against this, it is contended by the counsel appearing on behalf of contesting respondents that the powers vested under Section 35 of the Indian Registration Act was erroneously exercised by the Sub Registrar with the connivance of the petitioners and therefore, the Registrar in the facts and circumstances of this case rightly rectified the wrong done by the Sub Registrar. It is also contended that even if the order of the Registrar is held to be bad, then also it is not a fit case for exercising powers under Article 226 of the Constitution of India. It is contended that the order of the Registrar has done substantial justice and therefore, calls for no interference.

4. In order to consider the respective contention of learned counsel for the parties, it is necessary to notice few facts;

5. In 1960, Jagir Kaur, mother of Swaran Singh made an application to the District Judge, Ambala, under the Indian Lunancy Act for appointment of guardian and manager of the estate of lunatic, Swaran Singh. Her petition was contested by Puran Singh, Jagjit Singh, Hardial Singh sons of Hazara Singh on the ground that she being the natural guardian cannot be appointed guardian and manager of the estate of lunatic, Swaran Singh. The learned District Judge vide order dated 1.4.1982 dismissed the application filed by Puran Singh and others. The said Puran Singh and others filed an appeal in the High Court. During the pendency of appeal, Jagir Kaur died. On account of her death, the High Court ordered that appellant, Puran Singh and others may apply afresh for being appointed as guardian of the person and manager of the property of the lunatic. Puran Singh and others thereafter filed an application for inquisition under Section 62 of the Indian Lunancy Act before the District Judge, Ambala. On their application, notice was issued to the General Public, but none came forward to contest the petition. In the said proceedings. Dr. R.K. Patnaik, Senior Officer (Psychiatry), General Hospital, Ambala, deposed that from 29.1.1980 to 2.2.1980, Swaran Singh remained under his observation. He opined it to be a case of mental retardation as the person was unable to take care of himself being a man of unsound mind. Dr. S.C. Goyal, Civil Surgeon, deposed that while posted as Registrar, Medical College, Rohtak in May, 1980, Swaran Singh lunatic was found suffering from mental retardation. Swaran Singh was unable to take care of himself and his belongings without the help of others. The learned District Judge, Ambala, on the basis of evidence including the evidence of doctors, vide order dated 14.8.1984 recorded a finding that Swaran Singh is a person of unsound mind and is incapable of managing his property. Since the application for appointment of guardian and manager of the estate of lunatic was by 3 brothers who were undisputedly collaterals of the lunatic, the learned District Judge did not think it proper to appoint ail the three persons as guardian and manager of the person of the lunatic and ordered the appointment of Puran Singh, the eldest of all as guardian of the person and manager of his property Puran Singh who was appointed as guardian of the person of the lunatic and manager of the lunatic's estate, alone was competent to sell the land and that too with the permission of the Court. Section 75 of the Act empowers the manager to transfer the property with the permission of the Court. Proviso to Section 75 imposes a curb on the power of the manager to effect a sale. In this case, sale in favour of petitioners was not by the manager but by Swaran Singh who had been declared as a person of unsound mind.

6. In this background, the question to be considered is the competency of Swaran Singh to sell land vide registered sale-deed in favour of petitioners.

7. Section 7 of the Transfer of Property Act declares that every person competent to contract and entitled to transfer property can transfer the same to the extent and in the manner allowed and prescribed by law for the time being in force. Section 11 of the Indian Contract Act, 1872 lays down that every person is competent to contract who is of the age of majority according to law, to which he is subject and who is of sound mind and is not disqualified from contracting under any law to which he is subject. Section 12 of the Indian Contract Act deals with as to what is sound mind for the purpose of contracting. It says that a person is said to be of sound mind for the purpose of making 'contract' if at the time when he makes it he is capable of understanding it and for forming a rational judgment as to its effect upon his interests. It says that a person who is usually of unsound mind, but occasionally of sound mind, may make a contract when he is of sound mind. It also says that a person who is usually of sound mind but occasionally of unsound mind, may not make a contract when he is of unsound mind.

8. In Marshall v.. Whateley, (1920)1 Ch. 284, the Court of Appeal while dealing with the power of the lunatic to dispose of property, held:

"When a person has been found lunatic by inquisition, so long as the inquisition has not been superseded but continues in force, he cannot, even during a lucid interval, execute a valid deed dealing with or disposing of his property", xxx xxx

"The Court will not recognise such a deed even by directing proceedings to be taken to try the question of its validity or to perpetuate testimony as to the state of the lunatic's mind when it was expected, but will treat the deed as entirely null and void."

9. In Machaima and Anr. v. Usman Beari, (1907)17 Madras Law Journal 78, sale-deed executed by the plaintiff when he was a lunatic, was held to be void under Section 11 of the Contract Act and it was said that defendant cannot rely on such a document in support of his title. Reliance in this regard was placed on the judgment in Mohori Bibee v. Dharmadas Ghose, I.LR. 30 Calcutta, 539 wherein the Privy Council made it perfectly clear that Section 11 should be literally construed.

10. In Subba Naicker v. Solaiappa Naicker, A.I.R. 1933 Madras 624, the learned Judge of the Madras High Court, followed the judgments in Marshall's and Re: Walker, (1905) 1 Ch. 160 and held that alienation by a lunatic even during lucid interval is null and void.

11. In Kamola Ram and Ors. v. Kaura Khan, 1912 Punjab Records, No. 41, Hon'ble Rattigan, J. speaking for the Bench opined that a contract entered into by a person of unsound mind being void under Section 12 of the Contract Act, the claim of the plaintiffs for refund of sums advanced to the defendant-lunatic is not entertainable and must fail."

12. It is thus, settled that once a person is disqualified from contracting being of unsound mind, a contract by him is void. In this case, Swaran Singh had been found to be lunatic by inquisition and therefore, he was not competent to sell the land in favour of petitioners.

13. The next question to be considered is as to whether Registrar had any power under the Indian Registration Act to cancel the sale-deed registered by the Sub Registrar.

14. Sections 34 and 35 of the Indian Registration Act provide what a registering Officer has to do before registering a document. Under Section 34, he has to see that the persons executing the documents are appearing before him within the time allowed for presentation, as provided by sub-section (1). If he is satisfied in this respect, then he has to comply with the requirement set forth in sub-section (3). Section 35 lays down the procedure for what the Registering Officer should do as a result of the enquiries which he is required to make under Section 34. If all the persons executing the document admit the execution, then he has to register it. Section 68 of the Act empowers the Registrar to superintend and control the Sub Registrars. Section 35 and 68 of the Act read as follows:-

"35.(1(a) If all the persons executing the document appear personally before the registering officer and are personally known to him, or if he be otherwise satisfied that they are the persons they represent themselves to be, and if they all admit the execution of the document, or

(b) if in the case of any person appearing by a representative, assign or agent, such representative, assign or agent admits the execution, or

(c) if the person executing the document is dead and his representative or assign appears before the registering officer and admits the execution, the registering officer shall register the document as directed in Secs. 58 to 61, inclusive.

(2) The' registering officer may, in order to satisfy himself that the persons appearing before him are the persons they represent themselves to be, or for any other purpose contemplated by this Act, examine any one present in his office.

(3) (a) If any person by whom the document purports to be expected denies its execution, or

(b) if any such person appears to the registering officer to be a miner, an idiot, or a lunatic, or.

(c) if any person by whom the document purports to be executed is dead, and his representative or assign denies its execution, the registering officer shall refuse to register the document as to person so the denying, appearing or dead: Provided that, where such officer is a Registrar, he shall follow the procedure prescribed in Part XII:

Provided further that the State Government may, by notification in the Official Gazette, declare that any Sub-Registrar named in the notification shall, in respect of documents, the execution of which is denied, be deemed to be a Registrar for the purposes of this sub-section and of Part XII.

68.(1) Every Sub-Registrar shall perform the duties of his office under the superintendence and control of the Registrar in whose district the office of such Sub-Registrar is situate.

(2) Every Registrar shall have authority to issue (whether on complaint or otherwise) any order consistent with this Act which he considers necessary in respect of any act or omission of any Sub-Registrar subordinate to him or in respect of the rectification of any error regarding the book or the office in which any document has been registered."

15. A bare perusal of Section 35 of the Act would show that the powers of the Sub Registrar in registering a document presented to him for registration are absolute. Sub-Registrar for the purpose of satisfying himself with regard to identity of the persons appearing before him or any other such purpose contemplated by the Act, is empowered to examine any person in his office and it is only where the person by whom document purported to be executed, denies its execution or if any such person appears to be minor, an idiot or a lunatic, he shall refuse to register the said document. The power conferred under Section 68 of the Act on the Registrar to exercise superintendence and control over the Sub Registrar is administrative. A Division Bench of the Lahore High Court in Hussain Ali Shah v. Sardar Ali Shah and Ors., A.I.R. 1933 Lahore 786, held that Section 68(2) of the Act does not confer upon the Registrar the power of cancelling the registration of a document, the execution of which is not denied and which has already been registered by Sub Registrar. In Nyadarsingh v. Chensingh, A.I.R. 1955 Madhya Bharat 205, the Division Bench relied on the judgment of Lahore High Court, and held that Section 68 only empowers the Registrar to issue directions to the Sub Registrars in respect of the their ministerial functions and duties. The section does not confer on the Registrar the power of cancelling registration of a document, the execution of which is not denied and which has been registered by the Sub Registrar.

16. In the light of the judgments referred to above, order dated 20.3.1991 of the Registrar cancelling the sale-deed cannot be sustained. However, taking that the Registrar had acted without jurisdiction in cancelling sale-deed, I do not think that in the facts and circumstances of this case I would be justified in issuing a writ of Certiorari quashing the order of the Registrar. A writ of Certiorari being a writ of discretion is issued on in cases where the order sought to be quashed has occasioned a failure of justice. It is not every error of law that would induce this Court to exercise extra-ordinary jurisdiction under Article 226 of the Constitution of India. In this case, I am satisfied that nothing has been done by the Registrar which could be said to have caused any injustice to the petitioners. Challenge to the order of Registrar thus fails.

17. During the course of hearing, it has been brought to my notice that FIR No. 107 of 1991, P.S. Ambala City, was registered against the petitioners under Sections 467, 419, 471, 120-B, IPC. and 81 and 82 of the Registration Act, and the challan was put in against the petitioners but the Court seized of the matter has not taken any proceedings because operation of the order of the Registrar had been stayed by the Motion Bench. Since the writ petition is now being dismissed, the Court seized of the criminal case, is directed to conclude the proceedings in the said case expeditiously. Petitioners who have come in possession of the land on the basis of sale-deed dated 15.2.1991 are directed to restore possession of the land in their possession to the legal heirs of Swaran Singh, who in law have become entitled to the estate of the lunatic on his death.

18. Resultantly, the writ petition shall stand dismissed. No costs.

12 June, 2016 by Puneet Batish Advocate · 0

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